Last edited by Shagami
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Africville relocation report found in the catalog.

Africville relocation report

Donald H. J. Clairmont

Africville relocation report

by Donald H. J. Clairmont

  • 138 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Institute of Public Affairs, Dalhousie University in Halifax .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Nova Scotia,
  • Halifax,
  • Halifax, N.S.
    • Subjects:
    • Relocation (Housing) -- Nova Scotia -- Halifax -- Case studies.,
    • Urban renewal -- Nova Scotia -- Halifax, N.S. -- Case studies.,
    • Blacks -- Nova Scotia -- Halifax -- Case studies.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Donald H. Clairmont, Dennis W. Magill.
      Series[I.P.A.] - Institute of Public Affairs, Dalhousie University ; no. 102
      ContributionsMcGill, Dennis W., joint author., Nova Scotia. Dept. of Public Welfare., Canada. Dept. of National Health and Welfare.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD7305.H35 C55
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxi, 396, A1-A135 p. :
      Number of Pages396
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5250703M
      LC Control Number75323280

      By , Dr. Albert Rose, a Social Work and Welfare Specialist from the University of Toronto was commissioned to write a report on the community of Africville (submitted to the council on Dec. Despite being a distinct community for about a century, Africville did lack public services such as sewers and drinking water. Houses were condemned in several reports as woefully inadequate. And as government officials investigated ownership of the land before the relocation, they found only a few deeds and some claims of squatter’s rights.

      Africville Area - Numbering Plan, DD, /04/10 [cropped] City staff subject files. Various City staff created subject files and case files related to the relocation of Africville residents in the s. The City Manager, City Clerk, and the Engineering and Works Department all . Item is a photograph of two people lifting the cover on a well in Halifax's Africville neighborhood. The well has a sign that says "Please boil this water before drinking and cooking." The photograph was used in Donald Clairmont's "Africville Relocation Report" ("The Wells" pg. ).

      Africville Church (est. ) - rebuilt as part of the Africville Apology. Part of a series on the. History of Halifax, Nova Scotia; History. Halifax (former city) (–) Dartmouth (–).   Africville, the latest book by former Halifax poet laureate Shauntay Grant, is based on a poem she was inspired to write several years ago while sitting at the Africville site in Halifax’s north.


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Africville relocation report by Donald H. J. Clairmont Download PDF EPUB FB2

But it also used the language of human rights, claiming that relocation would improve the standard of living for residents. In JanuaryHalifax City Council voted to authorize the relocation of Africville residents. Before this decision was made, there was no meaningful consultation with residents of Africville to gather their views.

Africville Relocation Report Supplement  Clairmont, Donald H. ; Magill, Dennis W. (Institute of Public Affairs - Dalhousie University, ) Chapters 6, 9, and 10 of a manuscript presented to McClelland and Steweard Limited for publication under the title Africville: Relocation and Social Change in a Canadian Black Community.

Africville relocation report. Halifax: Institute of Public Affairs, Dalhousie University, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Donald H J Clairmont; Dennis W McGill; Nova Scotia.

Department of Public Welfare.; Canada. Department of National Health and Welfare. In their preface to the Africville Relocation Report the Co-Directors of the Study, Dr.

Donald H. Clairmont and Dr. Dennis W. Magill, indicated their intention to undertake further work beyond the scope of the official report completed in July, They have done so in conjunction with. The relocation of Africville meant the end of a vibrant community coupled with feelings of grief, loss and outrage.

Inthe CBC Radio program Identities looked at Africville again, in an. Donald Clairmont's Africville Relocation Report portrays the Africville relocation as a grave injustice inflicted upon a voiceless minority by an insensitive city administration.

Initially, however, the relocation enjoyed the support of Black leaders, community residents, and city administrators. This paper argues that two major factors caused the transformation of the Africville relocation. Debut Novel, Africaville, from Jeffrey Colvin started off a little slow then started moving at the speed of a tractor hoeing the fields in Halifax.

Kath Ella is a young woman at the start of this book interchanging from the past of her family to the future throughout the book compromising her and her son Etienne's generational s: From Africville to New Road: how four communities planned their development Tolliver, Althea J.

Book, CD Talking Book, 10 audio discs (12 3/4 hr.): Restricted to Print Disabled patrons. Place Hold. 0 holds / 1 copy Africville relocation report. Clairmont, Donald H. Africville, African-Canadian village formerly located just north of Halifax, Nova Scotia, d in the midth century, Africville became a prosperous seaside community, but the City of Halifax demolished it in the s in what many said was an act of racism after decades of neglect and the placement of undesirable services there.

The mayor of the Halifax Regional Municipality. Razing Africville. By Jennifer Nelson. Razing Africville examines this history as the prolonged eviction of a community from its own space.

By examining a variety of sources - urban planning texts, city council documents, news media, and academic accounts - Jennifer J. Nelson illustrates how Africville went from a slum to a problem to be solved and, more recently, to a public. File UA, Folder 10 - Africville relocation report: a summary.

Institute of Public Affairs fonds; Projects and working groups; Records from the Africville relocation project; Africville relocation report.

The forced relocation of African-Canadian residents from the Halifax suburb of Africville between and was, according to some people, an opportunity to improve the residents’ poor living conditions.

Others saw the relocation as the destruction of a community. Africville - Africville - Culture: Africville was a culturally significant place.

The Africville Brown Bombers were a popular team in the Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes—a business largely run out of Africville—and drew big crowds from the founding of the CHL in until it closed in In the s, boxer Joe Louis visited Africville, as did musician Duke Ellington.

The report, written by Dr. Albert Rose of the University of Toronto, recommended the clearance of Africville and the relocation of its residents over a two to three year period.

This Africville Relocation Project was managed by the Department of Development and by social worker Peter J. MacDonald.

New Book for Children Author Christine Welldon’s book launching of her new book, The Children of Africville was held at the Halifax North Memorial Library on Octo Report Released The Seaview Church and Africville Interpretive Centre Feasibility Study/Business Plan Final Report is.

Genre/Form: Case studies: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Clairmont, Donald H.J. Africville relocation report. Halifax: Institute of Public Affairs. Africville was a small community located on the southern shore of Bedford Basin, in Halifax, Nova Scotia that existed from the early s to the s.

It was founded by Black Nova Scotians from a variety of origins. "Many of the first settlers were former slaves from the United States, Black Loyalists who were freed by the Crown during the. City of Halifax officials and officials in the United States and other parts of Canada praise the relocation of Africville.

News reports hail the relocation as a glowing achievement. Location Address Africville Rd, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3K 2R9. Mailing Address PO Box RPO Novalea, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3S 5V8.

[email protected] One of the most interesting resources on Africville, this book features multiple contributors as well as many fantastic pictures of the community.

Made to City Council Regarding the Submission of Irvine Carvery of the Africville Genealogy Society Concerning the Africville Relocation Program Report] Africville Relocation.Africville was a small community located on the southern shore of Bedford Basin, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, which existed from the early s to the s, and has been continually occupied from to the present through a protest on the ille is now a commemorative site with a museum.

The community has become an important symbol of Black Canadian identity, as an example. Africville was a vibrant Black community for more than years. But even though its residents paid municipal taxes, they lived without running water, sewers, paved roads and police, fire-truck and ambulance services.